Live a Life of Adventure

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Live a Life of Adventure

Let’s face it, the majority of us are looking at online adventures and stories at our work desk while we are grinding away on a 40 hour work week. This site is meant to give you an outlet outside of that hustle...hence the name of the site. People are creatures of habit, and most of the time that habit involves clocking 40 hours and then lounging around at home. I encourage everyone that falls under that stereotype to break free! Most people think its impractical to live an adventurous life if you have day to day obligations, but I completely disagree with that assumption. So how do you start adding adventure to your daily grind? It's easy, get your lazy ass up and go do the stuff you've always wanted to do. Ok, ok, I know it's not that easy, so here are a couple of things recommend. 

 Joffre Lakes

Joffre Lakes

Don't Dwell on the Details

If this is your first rodeo I definitely encourage planning things out. I went overkill on the details my first couple of trips. Now? Most of the time I throw my gear in my trunk and I say if this trip falls apart I will just wing it. It is important to be prepared, but part of being adventurous is embracing the unexpected. My expectations are always high, but for me having a plan involves stressing out to ensure I knockout everything on that list. Be adventurous and just go! I think a common misconception is you have to have a detailed plan and know exactly what you are doing and when you are going to do it. Carve out one or two days and see where adventure takes you, even if it's something close to home. 

Make a Financial Plan

I’m an advocate for financial planning in general, but start setting aside an adventure fund to pay for your trips. I like to have a short term and long term fund. Short term for the road trips and long term for the plane rides (hello, Thailand!). Honestly if you can manage to drive to some spots it shouldn’t be too expensive. Getting your initial gear eats up a good chunk of change, but after that if you take care of your equipment you are just paying for gas, food, camping/park fees, and then random expenses. Some friends and I budgeted 2 months for our recent road trip and we spent maybe $200 individually, and that included gas and $60 in park fees. Ultimately you are more likely to take a trip if you have money set aside for that.

Be Resourceful

Save money by borrowing gear, repair equipment that is fixable, take care of the gear you have now, watch for sales and discounts, and prepare your own food. I don’t think I have ever paid full price for my equipment, and I have found some incredible deals online. Regardless of your method spend some time determining how you can shave some costs from your trips. Don’t assume you need what everyone has on social media; the plaid blanket, new rugged boots, and designer jeans aren’t necessary. You can even rent cameras and lenses online (this is the only way I can afford to use the coveted Sony A7).

I will add in some trips I would recommend, gear recommendations, and other travel suggestions. If you have specific questions or just general comments, please post below.